Private providers must serve the public interest

In the middle of March 2020, it was clear that the NHS would not have the capacity to deal with the increased demands of the Covid-19 epidemic. This lack of spare capacity is clear evidence of continuing government failure to invest in the NHS to provide the required flexibility to meet unplanned needs.  As a necessary but panic measure to deal with the threat of COVID 19, Johnson’s Government struck a deal with the private hospital sector to rent beds from them at a cost of £2,400,000 per day.

By the end of June, after approximately one hundred days this will already have cost the NHS a quarter of a billion pounds. It is clear that the Government can find funds when they are needed and that their default position is to throw money at the private sector despite the shocking record of commercial organisations in providing health and social care.

This is a disgrace which has thrown a lifeline to the private health providers who would have not been able to operate normally during the pandemic and would have lost huge quantities of money but for this.

NHS hospitals have largely coped with the first wave of the COVID 19 pandemic by ceasing all other activity and by the public co-operating with a country-wide lockdown. The extra capacity has been mostly unused. Effectively the private hospitals have received tens of millions of pounds of public money, and rising, to do nothing.

As the NHS begins to deal with the huge backlog of non COVID care these private hospitals must be obliged to make their facilities available to help with the catch up in care and they must do so taking into account the windfall they have obtained to date.

There must be no profiteering from Covid-19.

We demand:

  • Private hospitals must provide value for the money already paid to them and make their facilities available to help clear the backlog of NHS care for no extra charge.
  • There must be full scrutiny and open book accounting to ensure that taxpayers can see that they are getting value for money.
  • Commercial organisations must not be permitted to cherry pick their way to bigger profits at a time of great national emergency.

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/health/coronavirus-nhs-waiting-times-surgery-privatisation-a9550831.html?amp

Doctors in Unite statement 28/06/20

The only future for the NHS after COVID-19 is a return to its founding principles

The COVID-19 pandemic illustrates the vital importance of a comprehensive, publicly funded and universal health service. The choices we make during this crisis will shape the future of the NHS and our wider society.

We are already limited by poor decisions made before the virus struck. The Conservative’s ‘hostile environment’ policy, where people with a precarious immigration status risk deportation or destitution if they seek NHS services, means there may now be considerable apprehension to access necessary care. Though coronavirus treatment is exempt from charging for those without documentation, this message is likely to be lost.

When more beds were needed, rather than requisition private hospitals the government struck a deal where beds are rented for £300 each, per day. This amounts to a public sector bail out of private hospitals that the NHS should never have to pay. These beds could be utilised in the public interest; instead they are rented at public expense.

The government then wrote off £13.4bn of NHS debt. It is disingenuous to call this debt. It represents money that has been rightly spent on patient care, and the government’s actions acknowledge this with a trick of accounting. It is also only a fraction of the shortfall in NHS funding over the last ten years of austerity.

A sincere approach to the NHS’ debt would be to cancel Private Finance Initiative payments. £2bn was paid in 2016/17 in PFI debts, and repayments will continue every year until 2050. This lost wealth represents around 2% of the annual NHS budget. It could be reinvested to improve the nation’s health but instead vanishes into private hands. The same is true for private buildings used for NHS services. There is an opportunity to return these to the ownership of the public they serve.

Fragmentation, cuts and creeping privatisation have all contributed to the difficulties in our response the pandemic. More than 17,000 beds have been cut from the 144,455 that existed in 2010. The UK has a lower number of critical care beds per person than Italy, France, Spain, Germany, the USA, Japan, or South Korea. Years of underfunding led us to this moment. The PPE distribution fiasco shows the inability of the private sector to provide the service needed. Cutting warehouse capacity in order to prioritise profit means private distribution companies cannot now supply health and social care workers with the person protective equipment they need.

The hundreds of billions of pounds made instantaneously available in response to coronavirus shows the transformative power of the state to provide a crucial safety net for all of us. We can afford a far fairer society than the one we became accustomed to. Rapid changes to manufacturing capacity to produce ventilators, dialysis machines, PPE and other socially useful products demonstrates that an economy based on public ownership, planning and democratic control could meet the needs of people across the world, unlike the chaotic response of the free market.When this crisis eventually subsides, the public must not be made to pay. We must not return to more austerity.

We also cannot emerge from this pandemic and continue to ignore the harm caused by environmental destruction. The delayed, incomplete initial response to coronavirus echoes our apprehension to face the challenge presented by climate change. We should confront the runaway economic expansion that created the conditions for previous, current, and perhaps future outbreaks. We have an opportunity to live within our planetary means.

We could recreate our health and social care systems based on need not profit. We could choose to reduce inequality permanently. The reset button on society has been pushed – what happens next is up to all of us.

Joint campaigning to defend the NHS

The annual NHS winter crisis is now a continuous crisis. The latest performance figures for emergency departments are the worst ever and waiting lists continue to increase. The government has promised much, but there is little hope this will translate into real improvement.  The situation continues to worsen due to chronic underfunding of health and social care, cuts, closures and huge staff shortages. Brexit and the looming threat of a US Trade Deal are also on the horizon.

We must stand together with other campaigning groups to speak out and take action to defend the NHS. Dr Jackie Grunsell’s motion at the Doctors in Unite AGM commits the union to this coordinated effort.

Our starting point will be on February 15th, the Winter Crisis Day of Action, arranged by Health Campaigns Together and Keep our NHS Public. Other national and local events are running around the country.

We are stronger when we work together. Doctors in Unite resolves to do all in our power to join with other campaign groups and trade unions for the organised resistance now required.