The threat posed by COVID-19 demands a united national response across the UK. As well as protecting individual and public health, the burden of maintaining public resilience must be shared equally, on a pooled basis across society.

In response to COVID-19, Doctors in Unite urges the government to:

  • Extend day-one sick pay to those on zero hours contracts, in the ‘gig-economy’ and to the self-employed.
  • Ensure that workers are not under pressure to attend work while they are unwell and may inadvertently pass on the disease, both financially and in regards to staffing.
  • Allow the NHS to requisite private health care facilities to accommodate effective COVID-19 treatment and quarantine provision if needed.

Trades Union Congress General Secretary Frances O’Grady has said:

“Employers have a duty of care to support workers affected by coronavirus. No one should have to worry about making ends meet if they have to self-isolate or if they fall ill. They should be able to focus on getting better.”

The government issued a statement on 4th March, explaining that statutory sick pay (SSP) would be available from day one, and that “there is a range of support in place for those who do not receive Statutory Sick Pay, including Universal Credit and contributory Employment and Support Allowance (ESA).”

This solution is not sufficient for the three million people in the UK on self-employment contracts plus the two million workers who do not earn enough (£94.25 per week) to claim SSP. In order to claim, these workers would need to enrol for Universal Credit which can take up to five weeks for payment. The alternative is ESA which requires claimants to have built up two to three years of National Insurance contributions.

Doctors in Unite endorses the position adopted by the Socialist Health Association which strongly supports the TUC, and urges that this scheme is extended to those workers who currently do not qualify for SSP.

Employers should make up SSP to the average pay of workers to ensure they are under absolutely no financial pressure to attend work while they are unwell and may inadvertently pass on the disease. This must apply not only when patients are ill but also when people are laid off work for public health reasons, even if they themselves are not actually unwell. 

This is an area where the government must step in, as many sectors (e.g. retail, hospitality, or care providers) which interact most with the public may not have the financial resilience to weather the storm created by COVID-19.

Should the coronavirus outbreak spread significantly everyone will be expected to respond by putting the interests of the community first. Undoubtedly workers will volunteer long hours and take on exceptional responsibilities. This will increase the risk of errors, which will need to be balanced against the risk of failure to treat patients in a mass outbreak. We urge professional bodies to be aware of this.

Our NHS must be in a position to requisition private health care facilities where it will increase local health capacity or facilitate quarantine provision.

As the trade union for medical doctors, Doctors in Unite congratulates our colleague trade unions and Labour leaders for engaging with the government and employers, to ensure that these steps are taken as a matter of urgency in the national interest.