Statement on key worker testing and contact tracing

Since the start of the lockdown we have called for contact tracing and widespread testing as the only means to establish the true prevalence of COVID-19. This is what the World Health Organisation urged all countries to do from the very beginning. 

We welcome Matt Hancock’s announcement of testing for symptomatic key workers and their families, and the promise of contact tracing. 

The fundamental principles of public health are finally being applied to the country’s most critical healthcare crisis. We congratulate the government on reaching this step. We should have been here weeks ago.

The government has acted far too slowly to change the fate of over 18,000 people who have already died. With each prevarication and each false promise an irreversible choice was made. When China, then Italy, then France were locking down, our government should have known what had to be done. But they waited.

In this ultimate test of the social contract, the livelihoods and lives of citizens depend upon the speed with which states act. Better late than never is simply inexcusable. 

The next challenge will be logistical: the rapid recruitment and training of contact tracers, and the robust and reliable collection of data. We wait in hope that the government’s response will be swift and substantial. Anything less would be another great disservice to us all.

There is no exit from the COVID-19 lockdown without population testing

It is not possible to undertake any meaningful planning for an exit strategy from the current lockdown without an understanding of COVID-19’s prevalence and our current levels of immunity.

On April 2nd Health Secretary Matt Hancock promised to test 100,000 people daily by the end of the month. On that same day the UK was testing ten times less, just 10,000 people per day. The government continues to state its desire to test. In reality are far from this target.

True prevalence is proving hard to predict. Where one study suggests 75% of people infected may be asymptomatic, another reports a very low rate of current infection – less than 1% of the tested population.

The only way out of this is to gather data and learn the truth.

Epidemiological studies of appropriately sized, randomised cohorts would determine the size of the vulnerable population. This testing would need to be repeated every few weeks in order to chart the progress of the disease.

We cannot just test those who attend hospital with symptoms. Only by widespread testing of the asymptomatic public will we learn the true spread of this virus.

Doctors in Unite statement on retired health workers returning to work during the coronavirus pandemic

The UK government has asked the General Medical Council to contact doctors who have retired within the last six years and grant them temporary registration, a licence to practice and return to the GP performers list or secondary care equivalent. 

Without consulting the individuals concerned the GMC passed their details to local health services. Tens of thousands of retired doctors will be contacted, encouraging them to return to practice.

Doctors are able to opt out, but if they do choose to start working again they must be assured of protection.

They should:

  • Complete a short survey to help determine skills.
  • Complete identity checks including a declaration of honesty letter, Disclosure and Barring Service declaration, and occupational health questionnaire.
  • Have a choice in what work to be involved in.
  • Expect to be tested for SARS-Cov2.
  • Not be expected to work if they choose not to for any reason.
  • Not be expected to work if they have co-morbidities.
  • Not be expected to work in direct patient facing roles. This recognises that increasing age is most likely an independent risk factor for severity of illness. Several retired health care workers who returned to work have died. Early epidemiological data suggests that BAME health care workers may also be at increased risk.

Suitable roles include:

  • Telephone support for NHS 111.
  • Helping in out-patients or GP surgeries by telephone.
  • Backfill for clinicians in direct patient facing roles.
  • Training other clinicians.
  • Psychological support and mentorship for clinicians on the front line.
  • Support for public health and community roles e.g. contact tracing.

Employment working conditions as laid out by the four devolved governments [1], [2], [3], [4] and GMC [5] guidance includes: 

  • Suitable pay and remuneration.
  • Six month contracts of employment.
  • Annual leave.
  • Employment by one organisation.
  • Pension protection.
  • Death in service benefits.
  • Free government indemnity cover with advice and support from defence unions [6].
  • No need for revalidation.
  • Induction and suitable training including Information Technology.
  • Provision of suitable equipment including IT, laptops, mobile phones, smartcards and passwords.
  • Proper home working facilities.
  • Suitable Personal Protection Equipment (PPE).
  • The expectation to work within limits of competency and the right to leave at anytime by submitting a notice period of no more than a week.

[1]    https://www.england.nhs.uk/coronavirus/returning-clinicians/faqs-doctors/#do-i-need-to-be-included-on-the-nhs-england-medical-performers-list-the-list-to-work-as-an-emergency-registered-practitioner-erp-in-primary-care

[2]    https://gov.wales/doctors-returning-nhs-assist-covid-19-guidance-html

[3]    https://www.gov.scot/publications/coronavirus—returning-to-registered-professional-practice-guidance/

[4]    https://www.health-ni.gov.uk/Covid-19-returning-professionals

[5]    https://www.gmc-uk.org/registration-and-licensing/temporary-registration/information-for-doctors-granted-temporary-registration/returning-to-work

[6]    https://bma-mail.org.uk/JVX-6TQS5-S0FWOA-40RGIL-1/c.aspx

COVID-19: the lack of safe PPE will be this government’s legacy

As the number of cases of COVID-19 in the UK continues to rise it has become increasingly clear that there is a dire shortage of appropriate PPE for health and social care workers.

There have been repeated assurances from the government that there is plenty of appropriate PPE. However it is widely reported from the front line that PPE is in very short supply, and that what is available does not adequately protect from infection. Deliveries do not arrive and hotlines that have been set up do not work. 

In desperation many health and social care workers have taken it upon themselves to source their own equipment from DIY stores, and some have made agreements with local secondary schools to make visors on 3D printers. This situation is wholly unacceptable.

Doctors in Unite de­mands transparency from the government about the real state of affairs with respect to the current reserves, on-going production and distribution of PPE. Health and social care workers are working long hours in stressful conditions in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. The government owe it to us to be honest, and acknowledge our very real and widespread experience with shortage of appropriate PPE and explain to us why it is lacking.

It is the duty of the employer to ensure that the working environment is safe for employees. As a trade union we contend that the current situation in health and social care with respect to COVID-19 and PPE is not safe for either patients or workers. We believe that health and social care workers should not work without appropriate PPE, as to do so endangers the worker and the patient. We do not believe that health and social care workers, including porters and cleaners, should inadvertently carry infection from one patient to another through lack of disposable equipment.

Research has shown that while approximately one in five will suffer severe symptoms, and approximately one in twenty may die, the vast majority of the population will suffer a mild illness – some so mild that they are unaware they are infectious.

We must therefore assume that everyone is infectious and protect ourselves accordingly. Failure to do this will result in health and social care workers becoming infected en masse, and unavailable for work in large numbers. This will put greater strain on the NHS and social care than already exists. It will result in patients becoming infected by health and social care workers. Consequently, and disgracefully, some patients and workers will needlessly die.

We demand that industry is immediately repurposed to produce appropriate PPE in adequate quantities to properly protect staff. At the very least this should be long sleeved gowns to cover all clothes, gloves, plastic overshoes, a mask (preferably FFP3, since coughs and sneezes are also aerosol generating events) and eye and face protection for all workers in the community. Critical care workers would need considerably greater protection. 

We demand to know where this equipment is being produced, in what quantities, and when and how it will be delivered to the front line. 

If the government will not give us this information we can only assume that the PPE is not available. Given that at the time of writing we are still to feel the full force of the pandemic in the UK, this would demonstrate a total abdication of the government’s responsibility to keep the population safe.

We reject any accusation that we are engaging in political point scoring. We believe that it is the duty of the trade union movement to draw attention to the harmful effects of government policy and to demand that the population (workers and patients) receive proper care. 

Failure to draw attention to damaging government policy now will only lead to far worse consequences in later months, when the full force of COVID-19 has hit, when people have seen their relatives refused critical care because there are not enough ventilators for everyone, and there is not sufficient staff to look after them. People will quite rightly ask why the trade unions and professional organisations did not speak out.

It has been recently reported1 that in 2016 then Secretary of State for Health Jeremy Hunt, now chair of the Health Select Committee rejected stockpiling of PPE for health and social care workers on the ground of cost. It is clear that the health of the nation has been put firmly behind the strength of the economy in terms of government priority.

Dr Jackie Applebee 

Chair, Doctors in Unite

Dr Rinesh Parmar

Chair, Doctors’ Association UK

Dr Gary Marlowe 

Chair, BMA London Regional Council (signing in a personal capacity)

Michael Forster 

Chair, Health Campaigns Together

John Puntis and Tony O’Sullivan 

Chairs, Keep Our NHS Public

Professor Wendy Savage 

  1. https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/mar/27/advice-on-protective-gear-for-nhs-staff-was-rejected-owing-to-cost

Demands in response to COVID-19


The challenge of coronavirus requires a radical response. We will overcome this virus, but current legislation falls short – much more must be done. We demand:

Full PPE

This must include FFP3 masks, visors/protective spectacles, fluid resistant gowns with sleeves and gloves for all health and social care workers dealing with patients and service users who have or are suspected to be infected with COVID-19. This is vital to prevent staff going off sick en-masse leaving no one to care for patients.

Widespread testing

Whole population testing for COVID-19 is essential, with particular attention paid to health and social care workers. Isolation and follow up of identified cases with rigorous contact tracing is crucial.

Laboratories in hospitals

Full pathology laboratories should return to hospitals. Cuts and privatisation of labs have reduced the capacity for testing so that when they are needed the system cannot cope.

Public control of private hospitals

Private health care facilities must be taken under public control and made available to assist the NHS in caring for ill patients.

Public control of industry

Key industries must be taken under public control and repurposed to manufacture equipment that is essential to deal with the outbreak of COVID-19, such as PPE, ventilators and antibiotics. 

An end to needless competition

The protection of intellectual property rights for key equipment such as ventilators must end, so that companies can collaborate to produce them. There is no place for the pursuit of profit and competition between companies during a national crisis. 

Support for staff to work remotely 

Guidance on confidentiality and data security should be rapidly produced. Investment in IT should take place to enable all those who need to work from home to do so. 

Protection and recompense for retired workers returning to work

Retired workers returning to the NHS deserve the proper provision of PPE and COVID-19 testing. Older people are more vulnerable to the virus, and will need thorough protection. 

Full pay when self-isolating

All UK workers who are off sick or self isolating due to COVID-19 should be paid as if they were in work. No one should be under financial pressure to work when government advice is that they should be at home. Previous record of days off sick should not be an impediment to this principle.

Universal basic income

Universal basic income must be made available for all in line with the living wage for the period of the crisis. This would be in place of all other benefits, universal credits or employment support.

Retraining for the newly unemployed

Those who have lost their jobs should be offered free retraining in roles that support our society and infrastructure during the pandemic. This could include medication delivery, care work, and supporting the socially isolated.

Universal access to essential services

Everyone should to be able to access the essentials that they need, including food and shelter. The homeless should be accommodated in empty hotels and houses. Supermarket stocks should be centrally managed and provisions distributed so that everyone can have what they need. 

Proportionate, time limited emergency laws subject to regular review

While being clear that everyone must be able to access what they need, there is a fine balance between ensuring equity of distribution and infringements of people’s reasonable rights and liberties. All new legislation that curtails civil rights must be limited in scope, be regularly reviewed, and should include a sunset clause.

Comprehensive support for vulnerable health groups

Services for the homeless and those who suffer from substance misuse must be maintained. These are vulnerable groups who are at high risk of complications from COVID-19 infection. They are often hard to reach and should be provided with phones so that key workers can maintain contact while working remotely.

Comprehensive social care

Disabled people are vulnerable and their needs must be properly met. They are at particular risk if their carers become unwell. Those who have accepted personal budgets are particularly at risk. Services must continue for them in all circumstances. 

An end to overseas charging

NHS eligibility checks for migrants leads to them not accessing healthcare as frequently. It is vital that during a pandemic, everyone gets the care they need. Charging overseas visitors for NHS care must be stopped and the legislation that allows this abolished.

Extended rent and mortgage payment holidays

Suspend rent and mortgage payments for all NHS and social care staff. No health or social care worker should be anxious about living costs. Many are at risk of losing household income if their partner loses their job. The current three month mortgage holiday should be extended to at least six months.

Psychological support for health and social care workers

Psychological support services should be provided at no cost for NHS and social care staff caring for patients during the period of the pandemic crisis.


We the undersigned support these demands and urge their adoption by the government as quickly as possible: